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12/30/2012

Tour tip: The spot every American should visit

IMG_1749WASHINGTON, D.C. - Having visited our nation's capital only about a dozen times and taken in many of its great sights finally did I see Arlington National Cemetary.

The former home of Conferedate general Robert E. Lee, Arlington is the final home to some of our nation's most respected names, and thousands of soldiers who died serving their country.

It should be a bucket list item for every American.

The obvious sites to visit is the gravesite of former U.S. President John F. Kennedy, whose wife Jacqueline is next to him. This site sits near the bottom of a hill, which at the top is the home of Robert E. Lee. Much of the home has been restored, and about half of the furniture here are the originals. Lee had a stunning view of the Potomac River, and the entire valley outside of his front door.

IMG_1754Don't miss the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the Battle of the Bulge memorial, and the U.S.S Maine Memorial, which includes the mast of the sunken ship that started the Spanish-American war.

Of the many monuments and memorials, the one that caught my eye was the large memorial for Pan Am Flight 103 which features Scottish stone. This was the flight that in December of 1988 exploded over Lockerbie, Scottland when terrorists denonated a bomb on board; 270 men, women and children died in the disaster.

To visit and walk the expansive grounds is free; there is a charge to park. Bus tours are available, but the best way to see this very special and these nearly spotless grounds is on foot. 

Prepare to walk. A lot. 

Click here for the website.

 

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Comments

David Ford

I hate America and this blog.

David Howard

The selective use of polygraphs by corrupt FBI officials must stop! No one is above the law, including FBI Director Robert Mueller, who conspired to cover up the Pan Am Flight 103 incident. Google "the selective use of polygraphs"

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