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06/06/2014

The hidden treasures along a D-Day tour

IMG_1032NORMANDY, France - Today marks the 70th anniversary of the Allied forces' invasion of France, and for any WWII enthusiast Normandy should be at the top of just about every bucket list, next to Pearl Harbor. Click here for the military's historical review of this incredible tactical achievement.

The American cemetery at Omaha Beach is the very best place to visit among the many sites on the Normandy coast, but the region is loaded with lesser known areas full of history.

The French government has left intact many of the German pill boxes, bunkers and giant guns that tourists can simply just walk in and out without having to pay $10. They are literally scattered on the coast line, or in fields that overlook the English Channel.

IMG_1039The cement-built bunkers are massive, dark, and offer little in the way of comfort. This could not have been a great assignment.

Pictured are some of the giant guns the Allied forces tried to destroy with aerial and Naval bombing before the troops landed on the beaches on June 6, 1944. Many were destroyed. Many survived to fire away at the incoming ground forces. 

IMG_1042If you are ever in France and are inclined to take in some of these sites, the best way to do this is with a car. 

Between Pegasus Bridge - the Eastern most point of the invasion - and Pointe Du Hoc to the west, there are countless musuems and other momentos from the allied invasion scattered along the coast that can easily fill up a few days. The final picture are some of the remaining giant cement chunks the Allied forces used to build a makeshift doc at Arrmonchnes-les-Bains.

IMG_1015The best way to do this is in a car where you can zoom up the coast and stop in for the museums, take in the beach towns, and see some of these incredible standing momuments to a day that changed the course of history.

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